Ultravate (Halobetasol Propionate)

ULTRAVATE™ Preparations

Westwood-Squibb

Halobetasol Propionate

Topical Corticosteroid

Indications And Clinical Uses: Halobetasol cream and ointment are high to super-high potency topical corticosteroids indicated for the relief of inflammatory manifestations of resistant or severe psoriasis and corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses. These products are not recommended for use in children.

Contra-Indications: In patients who are hypersensitive to halobetasol, to other corticosteroids or to any of the ingredients in these products.

Halobetasol cream and ointment are contraindicated in viral diseases of the skin including herpes simplex, vaccinia and varicella. They are also contraindicated in untreated bacterial, tubercular and fungal infections involving the skin.

Manufacturers’ Warnings In Clinical States: Pregnancy: There are no clinical trials of halobetasol in pregnant women. Therefore, this product should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Corticosteroids have been shown to be teratogenic and embryotoxic in laboratory animals at low doses when administered systemically. Some corticosteroids have been shown to be teratogenic after topical application. Halobetasol has been shown to be teratogenic in rats and rabbits at low doses. The human topical dose of halobetasol was embryotoxic in rabbits.

Lactation: Systemically administered corticosteroids appear in human milk and can suppress growth, interfere with endogenous corticosteroid production, or cause other adverse effects. It is not known whether topical administration of corticosteroids could result in sufficient systemic absorption to produce detectable quantities in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when administering halobetasol to a nursing woman.

Halobetasol cream or ointment is not to be used with occlusive dressing. These products are not formulated for ophthalmic use and should not be used in or near the eyes.

Halobetasol cream or ointment is for dermatological use only.

Precautions: General: In the presence of bacterial infections of the skin, an appropriate antibacterial agent should be used as primary therapy. If it is considered necessary, the topical corticosteroid may be used as an adjunct to control inflammation, erythema and itching. If a favorable response does not occur within a few days to a week, the steroid should be discontinued until the infection has been adequately controlled.

Significant systemic absorption may occur when steroids are applied over large areas of the body. To minimize this possibility, when long-term therapy is anticipated, interrupt treatment periodically or treat one area of the body at a time.

Halobetasol ointment produced HPA axis suppression when used at recommended doses of 7 g/day for 1 week in patients with psoriasis. These effects were reversible upon discontinuation of treatment.

Laboratory Tests: Patients receiving a large dose of a high potency topical steroid applied to a large surface area should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression. This may be done by using the ACTH stimulation, A.M. plasma cortisol and urinary free-cortisol tests. Patients receiving super-potent corticosteroids should not be treated for more than 2 weeks at a time and it is recommended that only small areas be treated at any one time due to the increased risk of HPA suppression.

Prolonged use of topical corticosteroid products may produce atrophy of the skin and s.c. tissues. If this occurs, treatment should be discontinued.

Topical corticosteroids should be used with caution in patients with stasis dermatitis and other skin diseases associated with impaired circulation, hypersensitive patients and patients with glaucoma.

Patients should be advised to inform subsequent physician of the prior use of corticosteroids.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis: Long-term animal studies have not been performed to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of halobetasol. Positive mutagenicity studies were observed in 2 genotoxicity assays. Halobetasol was positive in a Chinese hamster micronucleus test in vivo and in a mouse lymphoma gene mutation assay in vitro. In other genotoxicity tests including Ames/Salmonella assay, sister chromatid exchange test, chromosome aberration studies of germinal and somatic cells of rodents and mammalian spot test for point mutations, halobetasol was not found to be genotoxic.

Children: Halobetasol cream or ointment should not be used in children. Because of the higher ratio of skin surface area to body mass, children are at greater risk for HPA axis suppression, glucocorticoid insufficiency after withdrawal of treatment and Cushing’s syndrome while on treatment.

Information for the Patient: Patients using halobetasol cream or ointment should receive the following information:

1. This medication is to be used as directed by the physician and should not be used longer than the prescribed time period. It is for external use only. Avoid contact with eyes.

2. The medication should not be used for any disorder other than for which it was prescribed.

3. The treated skin area should not be bandaged or otherwise covered or wrapped so as to be occlusive.

4. Any signs of local adverse reactions should be reported to your physician.

Adverse Reactions: A total of 1 018 patients have been studied in halobetasol clinical trials, 596 received the ointment formulation, 341 received the cream formulation and 81 received both formulations. The incidence of adverse reactions with halobetasol cream and ointment were those commonly observed with topical corticosteroids.

The most frequently reported adverse reaction across all clinical trials with halobetasol was stinging (2%). Other adverse reactions related and probably related that were reported at less than 1% were: burning, erythema, acne, skin atrophy, pruritus, leukoderma, telangiectasia, pustulation, dry skin, bruise, rash, lichenified dermatitis, paresthesia, urticaria and fungal infection.

The most frequently reported adverse reaction across all clinical trials with halobetasol cream was also stinging (3%). Other adverse reactions related and probably related that were reported at less than 1% were: pruritus, burning skin, dry skin, leukoderma, erythema, skin atrophy, sore joint and eye pressure.

The following adverse skin reactions have been reported with the use of topical corticosteroids and may occur more frequently with high potency corticosteroids such as halobetasol cream and ointment. These reactions are listed in approximately decreasing order of occurrence: burning, itching, irritation, dryness, folliculitis, hypertrichosis, acneiform eruptions, hypopigmentation, perioral dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, maceration of the skin, secondary infection, skin atrophy, striae and miliaria. Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids has produced reversible HPA axis suppression, manifestations of Cushing’s syndrome, hyperglycemia and glucosuria in some patients. In rare instances, treatment (or withdrawal of treatment) of psoriasis with corticosteroids is thought to have provoked the pustular form of the disease.

Symptoms And Treatment Of Overdose: Symptoms and Treatment: Topically applied halobetasol can be absorbed in sufficient amounts to produce systemic effects including reversible HPA axis suppression with the potential for glucocorticosteroid insufficiency after withdrawal of treatment. If HPA axis suppression is noted, withdraw the drug gradually by reducing the amount and frequency of application. Recovery of HPA axis function is generally prompt and complete upon discontinuation of topical corticosteroids. Infrequently, signs and symptoms of glucocorticosteroid insufficiency may occur requiring supplemental systemic corticosteroids.

Dosage And Administration: Apply a thin layer of halobetasol cream or ointment to the affected skin and rub in gently and completely. Apply twice daily, or as directed by your physician. Treatment is to be discontinued when the dermatologic disorder is controlled.

Treatment with halobetasol cream or ointment should be limited to 50 g/week. The duration of therapy should not exceed 2 weeks without patient re-evaluation. Halobetasol cream and ointment are not to be used with occlusive dressing.

Availability And Storage: Cream: Each g contains: halobetasol propionate 0.5 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: cetyl alcohol, diazolidinyl urea, glycerin, isopropyl isostearate, isopropyl palmitate, methylchloroisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone, steareth-21 and water. Aluminum tubes of 15 and 50 g. Store at controlled room temperature between 15 and 25°C.

Ointment: Each g contains: halobetasol propionate 0.5 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: beeswax, dehymuls E, petrolatum and propylene glycol. Aluminum tubes of 15 and 50 g. Store at controlled room temperature between 15 and 25°C.

ULTRAVATE™ Preparations Westwood-Squibb Halobetasol Propionate Topical Corticosteroid

Connected Diseases :

Psoriasis

General Illness Information Medical Term: PSORIASIS Common Name: None Specified Description: Psoriasis is a recurrent skin condition which is characterized by macules and patches (flat…

Dermatoses

General Illness Information Medical Term: Dermatoses Common Name: Skin diseases Description: Dermatoses are a common name for a variety of skin diseases Types: Dermatologists have…